Happy 25th anniversary, Seville Expo ’92

On this day 25 years ago Seville welcomed the world for Expo 1992. Happy anniversary!

The Andalusian capital will mark the occasion with a series of events. King Juan Carlos and Queen Sofia will pay a visit to the city to give an official start to the festivities.

The two royals attended the original opening 25 years ago. 112 countries were represented at the event on the island of La Cartuja between April and October 1992. The national pavilions were supposed to be temporary, scheduled for demolition shortly after the event. However, most structures were never taken down. Today some of them are abandoned, while others accommodate tech and science companies.

Big City Little Monkey will mark the occasion with some pictures from the beautifully decaying site of Expo ’92.

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The hidden patios of Seville, photoessay

Seville’s building fabric is pierced by numerous patios. These courtyards are easy to spot on satellite photos. As a passive solution to the extreme heat, they are typical not only for palaces and public buildings but also to all residential blocks.

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Aerial photo of Seville and its patios | Source:Google Maps

Here are some Instagram pictures of the most beautiful courtyards I encountered during my 3-month stay in Seville.

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Tiles of Alcazar, photoessay

As Michael Schuermann says in an article for the Huffington Post, Seville is ‘the city of tiles’. 

Beautifully ornamented azulejos cover not only the walls of palaces and churches, but also the sides of bars and restaurants, the corridors of residential buildings and quite often the undersides of balconies. Tiles also serve as signage or as charming finish for stone benches.

This photo essay focuses on Alcazar – the royal palace in Seville, and offers a glimpse of the ceramic tiles that adorn its courtyards and cloisters. Most patterns are inspired by Islamic geometric motifs. Take a look after the break.

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