Timelapse: The noisy building works on Blackfriars rd #2

Link to Timelapse #1 here.

I still wake up from unpleasant construction noise almost every morning. It is progressing quite quickly, but I doubt I will be able to get a quiet morning sleep anytime in the next year or so. Here is a timelapse of the construction over the past two months.

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P.S.: This post will be updated with new pictures every month.

 

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Timelapse: The noisy building works on Blackfriars rd

Four months ago I moved into a new flat in Manchester (well, it is actually across the river in Salford). The place seemed great and I was really happy with my choice until I was woken up by construction noise on a Monday morning. How did I fail to see the massive construction site just outside my window before I rented the flat?!

The noise kept waking me up every single day, including weekends. It was driving me crazy until I decided to try and think positively about the situation. As an architectural assistant I don’t get to go on site enough and spend most of my time in front of a screen. Therefore, I decided to observe, analyse and learn from the construction outside my window.

Now I regard the construction noise as my alarm in the morning. My morning routine includes gazing through the window for five minutes and taking a picture of the site each day. Here is an animation showing the construction in progress:

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P.S.: This post will be updated with new pictures every month.

5 common misconceptions about Garden Cities

Yesterday UK’s housing and planning minister Gavin Barwell announced that £7.4 million will be invested to support the delivery of new homes and settlements including 14 ‘garden villages’ and 3 ‘garden towns’. This, of course, prompted the Garden City debate once again.

I researched this subject extensively 2 years ago when the 100-year-old idea re-surfaced due to the Wolfson Economics Prize competition. Yesterday’s news got me obsessing about Garden Cities again so I decided to outline the common misconceptions about Ebenezer Howard’s model that I observe every single time the topic re-emerges.

Continue reading “5 common misconceptions about Garden Cities”

Are Garden Cities the solution to UK’s housing crisis?

Ever since Ebenezer Howard first published his book ‘Tomorrow: a peaceful path to real reform’ in 1898, Garden Cities have been a highly influential but also extremely controversial concept. During the 20th century, the idea had a profound effect on urban planning not only because it was used as a framework for the building of many new settlements and suburbs, but also because it was recognised as a milestone in planning theory and inspired a number of urban design movements. Nevertheless, the Garden City also suffered heavy criticism for being a destructive, impractical and utopian planning model. Continue reading “Are Garden Cities the solution to UK’s housing crisis?”

Café Culture, Europe and Brexit

From the witty title, to the engaging writing style and intelligent analogies, this article offers an exciting and refreshing viewpoint on the overexploited topic of Brexit. Published prior to the referendum vote, it focuses on an important aspect that remained largely neglected during the Brexit campaign discussions – the EU is a project for social and cultural exchange, not simply a trade union.

I was quite disappointed that the overall Brexit rhetoric was limited to economic issues and failed to articulate the cultural, ideological and social implications of the vote. That is why I really enjoyed ArchDaily’s ‘It’s All in a Cup of Coffee (or, Indeed, Tea): Does Café Culture Embody the Idea of Europe?’ article by James Taylor-Foster (who, by the way, is also a MSA graduate).

You can read it here.